Highly Skilled Migrant Worker | Ukraine

Highly Skilled Migrant Worker | Ukraine

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DO YOU NEED MORE INFORMATION ABOUT HOW TO OBTAIN A DUTCH PASSPORT? HAVE YOU BEEN TOLD THAT YOU ARE NO LONGER A DUTCH CITIZEN?

Here you will find general information about Dutch citizenship, the different ways of acquisition and loss of Dutch nationality.

Is it legal to have dual nationality?

One nationality is the main rule. A dual or multiple nationalities is permitted in some cases.

Examples:

  • Married or registered partnership with a Dutch Citizen, i.e., at the time of the acquisition of Dutch nationality.
  • Option Procedure; Normally the renunciation requirement does not apply. Dual nationality or multiple nationalities is allowed in such cases.
  • Children. Dual citizenship is allowed if the child acquires more than one nationality at birth. If a minor child acquires Dutch nationality at a later date, the child can retain its other nationality.

Note: To determine whether the acquisition of your Dutch citizenship affects the legitimacy of your other nationality, you will have to verify your status through the other country’s legislation.

CONTACT

Amsterdam | The Hague

+31 (0) 20 215 10 18

NEWS

A COMPLIMENTARY CONVERSATION

One-Hour Consultation

HOW CAN WE HELP YOU?

Our legal services

At Adam & Wolf, we pride ourselves on providing excellent service, backed collectively by thirty years of immigration experience. We have a deep understanding of Dutch immigration laws and procedures. We know what the decision makers expect and demand. To begin your legal process, our immigration attorneys take the time to fully understand the goals for both your work and family life in The Netherlands, and create strategies for meeting each goal quickly and effectively.

As your advocates, we carefully guide you through the complex legal immigration process, continually informing you about your case and answering your questions.

YOU CAN COUNT ON ADAM & WOLF TO SUCCESSFULLY HANDLE ALL OF YOUR IMMIGRATION NEEDS.

Dutch nationality law is complex and constantly
subject to change.


Adam & Wolf, through many years of extensive experience, know how to most-effectively handle each individual case to a successful conclusion.

By establishing and maintaining strong relationships with MPs and Dutch associations worldwide, Adam & Wolf stay on top of the everchanging, most current developments in nationality law.

And by constantly following nationality law cases in municipalities and the Dutch embassies abroad, Adam & Wolf know the mindset and approach of the public officials at the IND.

Adam & Wolf are, in fact, recognized as the experts in nationality law and are regularly invited to speak at conferences and to the media at home and abroad.

Dutch Nationality Assessment
Via Article 17 RWN Procedure

It may occur that the Dutch government, for example, a municipality or an embassy, concludes that you no longer possess the Dutch nationality. It might be in your interest to initiate proceedings before the District Court of The Hague to allow the Court to determine whether:

You can apply for a residence permit while awaiting this court procedure in The Netherlands.

CASE STUDY

The Peruvian Chef

In Peru in 1990, a son was born to a Peruvian mother and a Dutch father. The parents never married. The father passed away a few years after the birth of his son. The son lived in Peru until he was 18 and had a Peruvian passport. During a family visit to The Netherlands, the son inquired about whether he was considered a Dutch citizen as well.

The Dutch municipality rejected his request for a Dutch passport. His father was not recognized as his legal father, according to the municipality, because there was no documentation that the Dutch man recognized his son as such. Moreover, it was determined that he should file a passport request at the Dutch Embassy in Lima. The Peruvian son requested that the Dutch Court in The Hague establish that he had acquired Dutch nationality by birth. The Dutch man had registered his son’s birth on a Peruvian birth certificate as the father.

According to Peruvian law, it was considered a legal recognition. The Hague District Court ultimately determined that the boy acquired Dutch nationality at birth and that he was still a Dutch citizen at the date of the court ruling. On the basis of that ruling, the municipality issued a Dutch passport. The son now owns and manages a food truck in Amsterdam, to introduce the Dutch public to Peruvian cuisine.